Presenters

Genealogies of Knowledge

Genealogies of Knowledge I

Translating Political and Scientific Thought

across Time and Space

The University of Manchester
7-9 December 2017

Presenters

Sandipan Baksi (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India)
Sandipan Baksi is a PhD candidate at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India. His ongoing doctoral thesis, Modernization of Agriculture in the Colonial Era: The Case of the United Provinces between 1890-1945, explores the attitudes and perceptions towards agricultural modernization in the colonial era, through a survey of the Hindi periodicals of the period. Sandipan was a research associate with a research project entitled Science and Modernity: The Case of the Agricultural Sciences, sponsored by Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR), between October 2013 to October 2015. He is currently working as Programme Coordinator at the Foundation for Agrarian Studies, Bengaluru, India. His interest areas include History of Science under Colonialism, Philosophy of Science, Agrarian History, Issues related to Technological evolution and Diffusion, and Intersections of Science, Language and Print Journalism in the Colonial Context.

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Samia Bazzi (Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon)
Samia Bazzi completed her doctoral studies at Heriot-Watt University (Scotland) and worked for many years as a professional translator in the Middle East and Africa in diplomatic, legal and military contexts. She is currently Senior Lecturer and Researcher in Translation Studies and Linguistics at the Centre for Languages and Translation, Lebanese University, Beirut, as well as a member of the Research Centre for Human Sciences at the same institution. Samia is the author of Arab News and Conflict: A Multidisciplinary Discourse Study (John Benjamins, 2009). Other publications include ‘The Role of Translation in Deconstructing and Constructing Sectarian Discourses in the Middle East’ in Traducción, medios de comunicación, opinión pública (Comares, 2016); ‘Ideology and Arabic Translations of News Texts’ (TTMC, 2015), and ‘Foreign Metaphors and Arabic Translation(Journal of Language and Politics, 2014).

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Seyhan Bozkurt (Okan University, Turkey)
Seyhan Bozkurt was born in Istanbul in 1980 and received her BA, MA and PhD degrees in Translation Studies from Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. She is currently Assistant Professor of Translation Studies at Okan University. The title of her PhD dissertation was The Canonization and Popularization of Realism in Turkish Literary Discourse through Translation: A Conceptual-Historical Approach. Her MA thesis, Tracing Discourse in Prefaces to Turkish Translations of Fiction Published by Remzi Publishing House in the 1930s and 1940, was published in 2010 by LAP Lambert Academic Publishing. She has presented papers at international conferences such as TRASLATA (2011) and the Third Translation Traditions Conference (2008), Beyond Linguistic Plurality: The Trajectories of Multilingualism in Translation (2016) and Retranslation in Context III (2017). Her current research interests are translation history, translation theory, literary translation, paratexts, agents in translation, conceptual transfer, discourse analysis, periodicals, translation and ideology. Dr Bozkurt is also a translator.

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Jan Buts (University of Manchester, UK)
Jan Buts is a PhD candidate at the University of Manchester’s Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, and a participant in its Genealogies of Knowledge project. He is currently conducting corpus-linguistic analyses of the recent linguistic trajectory of key concepts pertaining to the body politic.

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María Calzada-Pérez (Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain)
María Calzada-Pérez is Full Professor of Translation Studies at the Universitat Jaume I. Her research focuses on corpus-based translation studies, institutional translation (especially translation at the European Parliament), translation paedagogy, ideology, and advertising. She is Principal Coordinator of the ECPC (European Comparable and Parallel Corpora of Parliamentary Speeches) research group. She has produced books and papers such as (i) Calzada-Pérez, María (2007) Transitivity in Translating: The Interdependence of Texture and Context, Bern: Peter Lang; (ii) Calzada-Pérez, María (2010) ‘Learning from Obama and Clinton: Using Individuals’ Corpora in the Classroom’ in M. Moreno Jaén et al. (eds) Exploring New Paths in Language Pedagogy, London: Equinox, 191-212; and (ii) Calzada-Pérez, María (2017) ‘Five Turns of the Screw. A CADS analysis of the European Parliament’, Journal of Language and Politics: Online-First articles. She is also editor of volumes such as: Calzada-Pérez, María (2003) Apropos of Ideology, Manchester: St. Jerome.

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David Charlston (University of Manchester, UK)
Dr David Charlston, MMus, MITI, MCIOL is a freelance translator and independent researcher. He completed his PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester in 2012 and has recently been appointed Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies in Manchester (CTIS). He is currently helping with the corpus-building phase of the Genealogies of Knowledge project. His personal research relates to the influence of retranslations of German philosophy on the shaping and dissemination of liberal political theory. He has published work in The Translator and in Radical Philosophy, and is currently writing a monograph for Routledge Advances in Translation and Interpreting Studies on the life and work of A. V. Miller, who retranslated six Hegel titles during the cold-war era. He is a member of the Hegel Society of Great Britain and the Hegel Society of America.

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Glen Cooper (Claremont McKenna College/Pitzer College, USA)
Glen M. Cooper was recently visiting assistant professor of history at Claremont McKenna College. He teaches courses in history and religion, including Middle East, Medieval Europe, Byzantium, India, Qur’an, and history of science and medicine. He holds an undergraduate degree in mathematical physics, but has pursued advanced studies in languages and Islamic scientific civilization at Oxford and Columbia, with a Ph.D. from the latter. He has published on the transmission of medical and astronomical concepts from Greek into Arabic, and from Arabic into Latin and beyond. His Arabic edition and study of Galen’s treatise on the medical critical days (De diebus decretoriis) is a basis for study of the interaction of medicine and astrology through the Renaissance. His current projects are: a study of the body politic metaphor in Greek, Arabic, Byzantine Greek, and Latin, and a study of the foundations of astrology and medicine in the Abbasid period.

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Anna Maria D’Amore (Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Mexico)
Anna Maria D’Amore is a senior lecturer at the Autonomous University of Zacatecas (UAZ) in Mexico where she currently teaches English reading comprehension and translation courses to students in the Literature and Linguistics undergraduate programme. Leader of the “Language and Literature” Research Group and a member of the Mexican National System of Researchers (SNI), she is involved in various translation-related research projects and activities as well as supervising undergraduate dissertations and postgraduate theses on translation in several departments of the university. She is the author of Translating Contemporary Mexican Texts: Fidelity to Alterity (2009), the editor/translator of the Spanish-English bilingual anthology Voces Zacatecanas/Zacatecan Voices (2012), a collection of short stories and poems written in Zacatecas, Mexico, and more recently of contributions to Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series – Themes in Translation Studies (2016) and the Handbook of research on teaching methods in language translation and interpretation (Cui & Zhao, 2015).

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Christina Delistathi (Birkbeck, University of London and City, University of London, UK)
Christina Delistathi’s research focuses on the translation of political texts by counter-hegemonic institutions and activist networks. She has published on the translations of the Communist Manifesto into Greek, and on the construction of Marxist discourse within the context of power struggles for the control of Marxist theory. Her current research interests include the study of politically engaged translators’ working practices and the effects of these on translated texts and discourses, as well as the study of academic writing through a historical perspective.

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Tansel Demirel (Boğaziçi University, Turkey)
Tansel Demirel is a PhD student in the Department of Translation Studies at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. He currently works as an instructor at Okan University, Istanbul. He has worked as a translator and editor for a number of Turkish publishing houses. His translations into Turkish include The Politics and Poetics of Translation in Turkey, 1923- 1960 by Şehnaz Tahir Gürçağlar; Evliya Çelebi in Diyarbekir, edited by Boeschoten and van Bruinessen; The Great War and the 20th Century edited by Winter, Parker and Habeck; Poetry’s Voice, Society’s Song by Walter Andrews; Ottoman Manufacturing in the Age of the Industrial Revolution by Donald Quataert, and Masami Arai’s Turkish Nationalism in the Young Turk Era.

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Ahmed Elimam (University of Leicester, UK)
Dr Ahmed Elimam obtained his PhD in Translation Studies from the University of Manchester in 2009. He is currently a lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Leicester, where he teaches translation theory and practice at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Dr Elimam previously taught at the University of St Andrews and the University of Manchester. His research interests lie in the areas of Arabic literary translation, Qur’an Translation, and Translation and Ideology. He is particularly interested in the stylistic challenges that translators of Arabic in general and the Qur’an in particular come across and the total effect of their choices on their respective output. His recent publications include: ‘Translating the Qur’an into English: Target Readers’ Expectations’ (2017), ‘The Translation of the Qur’an: Different Loyalties’ (2014) and ‘Marked Word Order in the Qur’an and its English Translations: Patterns and Motivations’ (2013).

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Jonathan Evans (University of Portsmouth, UK)
Jonathan Evans is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth. He is author of The Many Voices of Lydia Davis (EUP, 2016) and co-editor of The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Politics (forthcoming 2018). He has published articles in journals such as Journal of Adaptation in Film and Performance, Translation Studies, Journal of Specialised Translation, Translation and Literature, and TTR.

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Fruela Fernández (Newcastle University, UK)
Fruela Fernández is a writer, translator, and academic, currently based at Newcastle University (UK). His research focuses mainly on the political uses and effects of cultural products from a transnational perspective. He has published a monograph —Espacios de dominación, espacios de resistencia (Peter Lang, 2014)— and edited two collective volumes on popular music: The Smiths: música, política y deseo (2014) and Joy Division: placers y trastornos (forthcoming). With Jonathan Evans, he is currently co-editing the Routledge Handbook of Translation and Politics. As activist translator and interpreter, he has volunteered for activist networks such as Plan C, ATTAC, and Climat 21. A multi-awarded poet, he has published three books in Spanish —Una paz europea (2016), Folk (2013), and Círculos (2000)— and co-directed Cosmopoética, an international poetry festival that won the Reading Promotion Award of the Spanish Ministry of Culture in 2009.

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Benjamin Geer (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Benjamin Geer is a Research Fellow in the Digital Humanities Lab at the University of Basel. His research has focused on nationalism, intellectuals, and social movements in Egypt. He has served as Visiting Assistant Professor and Associate Director of the Middle East Studies Center at the American University in Cairo, and has taught Arabic at the University of Tübingen. He did his PhD in Middle East Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London.

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Rainer Guldin (Università della Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland)
Rainer Guldin studied English and German Literature in Zürich and Birmingham (England). His PhD thesis focused on Hubert Fichte. He is lecturer for German Language and Culture at the Faculty of Communication at the Università della Svizzera Italiana in Lugano (Switzerland). He taught courses and held seminars at the Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, the Bauhaus Universität in Weimar (Germany), the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies of the University of Manchester (England) and the University of St. Gallen (Switzerland). He was visiting professor at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte (Brazil). He is Editor-in-Chief of the peer-reviewed open access e-journal Flusser Studies http://www.flusserstudies.net/. Areas of research: metaphor theory; translation and self-translation; multilingual literature, history of the body; landscape theory. Recent publications: Vilém Flusser (1920-1991). Ein Leben in der Bodenlosigkeit. Biographie (forthcoming); Translation as Metaphor, New York 2016; Politische Landschaften. Zum Verhältnis von Raum und nationaler Identität, Bielefeld 2014.

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Ting Guo (University of Exeter, UK)
Ting Guo is Lecturer in the Department of Modern Languages, University of Exeter. She is the author of Surviving Violent Conflicts: Chinese Interpreters in the Second-Sino Japanese War (1931-45) (2016). She has published in journals such as Literature CompassTranslation Studies and Translation Quarterly.

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Lavinia Heller (University of Graz, Austria)
Lavinia Heller is Professor of Translation Studies at the Department of Translation Studies, University of Graz. She received her PhD at the Faculty of Translation Studies, Linguistics and Cultural Studies, University of Mainz and holds an MA degree in Translation for Italian and Chinese. Her research interests include concept and theory formation in Translation Studies, the translation of philosophical and literary texts and intercultural communication.

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Tania P. Hernández-Hernández (El Colegio de México – Cátedras CONACyT, Mexico)
Tania P. Hernández-Hernández is a lecturer in Translation Studies at El Colegio de México, and a Cátedras-CONACyT researcher. She holds a PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester, UK, with a thesis on the role of translation in the internationalization of the press. Her research interests lie in the fields of sociology of translation, and translation and cultural production.

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Shahrzad Irannejad (Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany)
Shahrzad Irannejad is a PhD candidate at the interdisciplinary Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature: Universal, Local, Borrowed”, Mainz, Germany. In her current thesis project “Localization of the Avicennean inner senses in a Hippocratic body”, she tracks the Hellenistic roots of the medieval theory of Inner Senses in the framework of humoral medicine in the Arabic-speaking world. Her research deals with how knowledge is transformed as it is borrowed and transferred beyond linguistic and ideological borders.

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Henry Jones (University of Manchester, UK)
Henry Jones is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester’s Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies (UK). Having recently completed his PhD research focusing on translation in the context of Wikipedia, he is now working as part of a multi-disciplinary team on the AHRC-funded Genealogies of Knowledge project.

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Nannan Liu (University of Mainz, Germany)
Nannan Liu studied German Language & Literature and History of Art at Peking University, and received her postgraduate degree in Translation Studies from Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the PhD programme ‘Politik der Translation’ at the FTSK of the University of Mainz. Her main research interests include translation theories, translation of philosophy and politics of translation.

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Joana Malta (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / Universidade dos Açores, Portugal)
Joana Malta has a licentiate degree in sociology and a master’s degree in data analysis. Between 2008 and 2015, she worked as a senior statistician at the National Statistical Office, Having been granted a scholarship from the Science and Technology Foundation, she then began a PhD in the History of Ideas with a project in the field of Digital Humanities entitled From Historical Narrative to Digital History: The digital edition of the magazine A Águia.

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Alison E. Martin (University of Reading, UK)
Dr Alison E. Martin works as a Lecturer in the Department of Modern Languages and European Studies at the University of Reading (UK). She has published widely on nineteenth-century science, translation and knowledge exchange, and has co-edited two journal special issues on women as facilitators of scientific knowledge exchange in the Victorian period. Her second monograph (forthcoming, 2018) explores the translation and reception of Alexander von Humboldt’s writing in nineteenth-century Britain. She is currently working on a third monograph project which explores the transnational reach of British modernist writers, notably Vita Sackville-West, in twentieth- and twenty first-century Europe.

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Cláudia S. Martins (Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil)
Cláudia Santana Martins holds a Doctor of Letters degree in Linguistic and Literary Studies in English from the Faculty of Philosophy, Letters and Human Sciences (USP), where she is now a post-doctoral researcher in Translation Studies. She is also a professional translator, working from French and English into Brazilian Portuguese, and has extensive experience as a translator in a variety of fields, including literature, arts, history, sociology, philosophy, mathematics, and computer science.

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Julia Martins (The Warburg Institute, UK)
Julia Martins is a PhD student at the Warburg Institute in London, working under the supervision of Guido Giglioni and Joanne Anderson. She did her BA in History in Brazil, and after that, she moved to Europe to pursue a double MA in French and Italian history at the University of Paris Diderot and the University of Bologna. Her doctoral research focus is early modern recipes about female fertility and reproduction contained in Italian books of secrets and English midwifery manuals. She aims to demonstrate how these books circulated in translations and re-editions, shaping early modern understandings of the body, and influencing contemporary medical practices. Julia argues that the dialogue between these two genres, books of secrets and midwifery manuals, can give us interesting insight into how medical knowledge circulated in the early modern period, influencing gender roles and medical culture.

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Timothy McLellan (Cornell University, USA)
Tim is a PhD candidate in anthropology at Cornell University. Based on 2 years of participant observation at an agri-environmental research organization in Southwest China, his thesis explores the managerial and bureaucrat demands that various domestic and international institutions place upon contemporary scientists. Tim is currently writing up, and expects to graduate in 2018. He has a B.A. in Law and Chinese from The School of Oriental and African Studies, and an MSc in Law and Anthropology from The London School of Economics.

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Jasper Montana (University of Cambridge, UK)
Jasper Montana works on evidence, expertise and policymaking for environmental governance. His research draws on diverse disciplinary traditions, including human geography, organizational studies and political science, but is tied most centrally to the theoretical and methodological approaches of science and technology studies. From this perspective, his recent research has explored the place of expert authority in knowledge and policy institutions, and the means through which recent developments in transdisciplinarity and Anthropocene science perturb these systems of environmental governance.

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Verónica Murillo Gallegos (Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Mexico)
Verónica del Carmen Murillo Gallegos is a senior lecturer at the New Spain Studies Doctoral Programme at the Autonomous University of Zacatecas (UAZ), Mexico. She has taught Philosophy of language, Philosophy and literature, and the Philosophy of New Spain at undergraduate level, both at the Philosophy and the Literature and Linguistics Departments. Her research interests focus on the Philosophy of culture and Philosophy of New Spain and she collaborates in the areas of “Society and thought” and “Ruptures and continuities” as part of her work in New Spain Studies in the UAZ. She has been a member of the Mexican National System of Researchers (SNI) since 2008. She is the author of Cultura, lenguaje y evangelización. Nueva España, siglo XVI (Porrúa, 2012) y Palabras de evangelización, problemas de traducción (UAZ, 2009) and more recently she has published in Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series – Themes in Translation Studies (2016).

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Manuel Pavón-Belizón (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain)
Manuel Pavón-Belizón is a PhD candidate at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Barcelona), and a member of its ALTER research group. He holds a BA in Translation and Interpreting from the University of Granada (2006), and a MA in Chinese Studies from Pompeu Fabra University (2014). He specialized in Chinese at Beijing Jiaotong University and Beijing Foreign Studies University (2006-2009). As part of his current research, focused on the transnational circulation and reception of contemporary Chinese thought, he held a research fellowship at Peking University (2016). His main research interests are Chinese contemporary intellectual history and literature, translation history, and the transnational circulation of cultural productions. He is also a Chinese to Spanish translator.

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Susan Pickford (Université Paris-Sorbonne, France)
Dr. Susan Pickford is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies in the English department at the Université Paris-Sorbonne. She has published widely on the history of translation from the eighteenth century to the present, including a chapter on professional translation in the nineteenth century for the five-volume Histoire des traductions en langue française. Her particular research interests are the professional sociology of translators past and present and the interface between Translation Studies and Book History.

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Tony Sandset (University of Oslo, Norway)
Tony Sandset is a postdoctoral researcher at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, where he received his PhD in Cultural History. His current research focuses on knowledge translation within the field of HIV care and prevention. Specifically his focus is on how medical knowledge from randomized controlled trials is mediated, how evidence is generated in HIV prevention and how new medical technologies informs subjectivities, desire, and sexuality. Another of his research areas pertains to the intersection between race, gender, class and HIV care and prevention. Relating race, class and gender to how medical knowledge is disseminated and translated from research to clinical and community usage is of particular interest here.

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Ariel Shangguan (Newcastle University, UK)
Ariel Shangguan is a PhD candidate in International Politics at Newcastle University, UK. Her research interest lies primarily in the temporal-spatial conditionality of political knowledge and its translation.

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Eva Spišiaková (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Eva Spišiaková received a combined BA and MA degree in Japanese Language and Intercultural Communication from Comenius University in Bratislava, after which she spent a year at Tokyo University as an independent researcher focusing on early modern Japanese literature. In 2013, Eva moved to Scotland where she completed her MSc degree in Literary Translation as Creative Practice at the University of Edinburgh. She is currently a doctoral candidate in Translation Studies at the same university. Her research interests primarily include gender and particularly LGBTQ issues within translation studies, and she is likewise interested in questions of censorship and manipulation of translations under totalitarian regimes, especially within the countries of the former Eastern bloc.

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Mihael Švitek (Technical University Dresden, Germany)
Mihael Švitek (*1988) is Research Fellow at Technische Universität Dresden at the Department of Linguistic, Literature and Cultural studies and vice-director of the Dresden Center for Digital Linguistics. He is currently working on a doctoral thesis entitled Language and Ideology which will include a new methodological framework for the linguistic analysis of ideological concepts, having previously completed a master’s thesis on deconstructive interpretations in contemporary German gender linguistics. Mihael is currently teaching bachelor and master courses about Cultural and Political Linguistics and regularly gives guest lectures on different linguistic aspects of political history.

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Laura Tarkka-Robinson (University of Helsinki, Finland)
Laura Tarkka-Robinson is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Helsinki, Finland.   In her PhD thesis – centred on the role of Rudolf Erich Raspe (1736-1794) as a cultural mediator – she examined cultural transfer in the context of the Anglo-Hanoverian personal union. Her current research is affiliated with the COMHIS Collective and concerns the construction of national characters in Enlightenment discourse.

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Annarita Taronna (University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Italy)
Annarita Taronna has a PhD in Translation Studies from the University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Italy. She currently is a Researcher in English and Translation at the Department of Education, Psychology and Communication. Her main research areas include gender and/in translation studies, cultural and postcolonial studies, African-American and Chicana languages and literatures, English as a lingua franca in migratory contexts and the teaching of English as a second language (ESL). She is currently working on a research project on “Language mediation, translating and interpreting from the ferries to the reception and detention camps across the Mediterranean” as a component of the Italian network “S/murare il Mediterraneo: pratiche politiche e poetiche di artivismo” (Un/walling the Mediterranean: political and poetic practices of artivism).  On these topics she has already published several articles: (2013) “In search of new sea(e)scapes: the metaphors of the Mediterranean from mythological to contemporary narratives (In: Covi, Giovanna and Marchi, Lisa, (eds) Democracy and Difference: The US in Multidisciplinary and Comparative Perspectives, p. 301-308, TRENTO:Labirinti); (2016) Translation, hospitality and conflict: language mediators as an activist community of practice across the Mediterranean. Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series: Themes in Translation Studies, 14, 153-174.

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Franziska Toscher (Università degli Studi di Udine, Italy)
Franziska Toscher is a PhD student at the University of Udine under the supervision of Marella Magris (Università di Trieste) and Karl Gerhard Hempel (Università del Salento). She studied History and French Language, Literature and Culture at the University of Rostock (Germany), and received her MA in Translation and Cultural Mediation at the University of Udine. Her research interests concern the language of historiography as a special language, and the translation of historiographical papers from Italian to German with focus on the writer’s stance and its translation. She is also a freelance translator and a teacher for German as a foreign language in schools for professional and further education.

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Gerhard Wiesenfeldt (University of Melbourne, Australia)
Gerhard Wiesenfeldt is a Lecturer in the History of Science at the University of Melbourne. He holds an MSc in Physics and a PhD in History of Science, both from the University of Hamburg. He has published extensively on the history of experimental natural philosophy and the role of the sciences in early modern universities, with a focus on the Dutch Republic and protestant German countries. He is currently working on a book on the relation between practical mathematics and natural philosophy in the Dutch Republic. Recent publications include: (2016) ‘Academic Writings and the Rituals of Early Modern Universities’, Intellectual History Review, 26: 447-460; (2016) ‘Craftsmen, Merchants and Scholars: Hiring practices at the Universities of Leiden and Edinburgh, 1575–1750’ (with Aaron Mitchell), Yearbook for the European Culture of Science, 8: 163-187.

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Krisztina Zimányi (Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico)
Krisztina Zimányi is a lecturer at the Department of Language of the University of Guanajuato (UG), Mexico where she has taught Psycholinguistics and Translation courses on the undergraduate and postgraduate English and Spanish teacher training programmes. In inter-departmental collaboration, she has been the principal investigator of a feasibility study and a regional state-of-the-art project of translation that has led to the establishment of a postgraduate Diploma in Translation at the UG. She has also supervised undergraduate theses on subjects related to translation. She is the author of a number of articles on mental healthcare interpreting in Ireland and, more recently, on the ethical implications of the visual representation of the Malinche as an interpreter in contemporary sources. In collaboration with the other two presenters, she has published on the translation of the collision of cosmovisions in New Spain. Her research interests include translator education, translation ethics and the relationship between agents in translation.

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