Presenters

Genealogies of Knowledge

Genealogies of Knowledge I

Translating Political and Scientific Thought

across Time and Space

The University of Manchester
7-9 December 2017

Presenters

Eman Alkroud (University of Manchester, UK)
Eman Alkroud is a PhD candidate at the University of Manchester. She received her B.A. in English Language and Literature from the University of Dammam in Saudi Arabia. In 2013 she received her M.A. in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester. Between 2007 and 2010, she worked as a freelance translator and cooperated with the Kuwaiti Centre for Research and Studies by translating two books about the history of the Arabian Gulf. She is passionate about translation, reading and history.

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Clemet Askheim (Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences / University of Oslo, Norway)
Clemet Askheim is currently working as Research Assistant at the Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo. He received his MA in Philosophy from University of Bergen, with a thesis on the dialectics of liberation in Sartre’s Critique of Dialectical Reason and Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth. He has since been teaching philosophy at Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences and University of Bergen. His research interests include political philosophy, Marxist theory, philosophy of science, history of science, and existentialism. His current research focuses on the history of the concept of sustainability, knowledge translation in medicine, the foundations of evidence-based medicine, and ontologies of medicine.

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Sandipan Baksi (Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India)
Sandipan Baksi is a PhD candidate at the Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, India. His ongoing doctoral thesis, Modernization of Agriculture in the Colonial Era: The Case of the United Provinces between 1890-1945, explores the attitudes and perceptions towards agricultural modernization in the colonial era, through a survey of the Hindi periodicals of the period. Sandipan was a research associate with a research project entitled Science and Modernity: The Case of the Agricultural Sciences, sponsored by Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR), between October 2013 to October 2015. He is currently working as Programme Coordinator at the Foundation for Agrarian Studies, Bengaluru, India. His interest areas include History of Science under Colonialism, Philosophy of Science, Agrarian History, Issues related to Technological evolution and Diffusion, and Intersections of Science, Language and Print Journalism in the Colonial Context.

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Michela Baldo (University of Hull, UK)
Michela Baldo is a Teaching Fellow in Translation Studies at the University of Hull and former Lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Leicester. She has written articles on Italian-Canadian and Italian-American works and their written and audio-visual translation into Italian (and she is writing a monograph on the topic for Palgrave) and she also coedited a volume on subtitling in intercultural encounters with Beatrice Garzelli, Subtitling and Intercultural Communication (2014). Her more recent research deals with the translation into Italian of queer theoretical understandings. She has published articles on queer femininity and performance and co-edited a book on queer drag kings (Il re nudo. Per un archivio drag king in Italia, 2014), and is now investigating the role of translation in queer transfeminist activist movements in Italy, paying particular attention to the notions of performativity and affect (publications on the topic are forthcoming).

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Samia Bazzi (Lebanese University, Beirut, Lebanon)
Samia Bazzi completed her doctoral studies at Heriot-Watt University (Scotland) and worked for many years as a professional translator in the Middle East and Africa in diplomatic, legal and military contexts. She is currently Senior Lecturer and Researcher in Translation Studies and Linguistics at the Centre for Languages and Translation, Lebanese University, Beirut, as well as a member of the Research Centre for Human Sciences at the same institution. Samia is the author of Arab News and Conflict: A Multidisciplinary Discourse Study (John Benjamins, 2009). Other publications include ‘The Role of Translation in Deconstructing and Constructing Sectarian Discourses in the Middle East’ in Traducción, medios de comunicación, opinión pública (Comares, 2016); ‘Ideology and Arabic Translations of News Texts’ (TTMC, 2015), and ‘Foreign Metaphors and Arabic Translation(Journal of Language and Politics, 2014).

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Gil Ben-Herut (University of South Florida, USA)
Dr. Gil Ben-Herut is Assistant Professor in the Religious Studies Department, University of South Florida. He received his Ph.D. from Emory University in 2013 and his research interests include pre-modern religious literature in the Kannada language, South-Asian devotional (bhakti) traditions, and the vernacularization of Sanskrit poetics and courtly poetry. Dr. Ben-Herut’s forthcoming book in Oxford University Press discusses the early Kannada Śivabhakti movement, known today as ‘Vīraśaiva’ and ‘Liṅgāyata’. He has published articles in the journals Religions of South Asia, International Journal of Hindu Studies, and Journal of Hindu Studies that explore interreligious conversations between Hindu, Jain, and Buddhist traditions in various contexts. Dr. Ben-Herut is the co-founder of the Regional Bhakti Scholars Network (RBSN), a platform for facilitating scholarly conversations about South-Asian devotional traditions.

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Karen Bennett (Nova University, Lisbon, Portugal)
Karen Bennett lectures in History and Theory of Translation, Scientific Translation and Academic Writing at the Nova University in Lisbon. She has a MA and PhD in Translation Studies from the University of Lisbon, and researches the translation and transmission of knowledge (amongst other things) with the Centre for English, Translation and Anglo-Portuguese Studies (CETAPS) and University of Lisbon Centre for English Studies (ULICES/CEAUL). She has published three books, numerous articles and book chapters, and is also currently co-editing a special issue of The Translator with Rita Queiroz de Barros on the subject of International English and Translation.

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Nesrine Bessaïh (University of Ottawa, Canada)
Nesrine Bessaïh has a Master’s degree in Anthropology (McGill University) and is a Ph.D. student in Translation Studies at the University of Ottawa. Her doctoral research brings together anthropology, gender studies and translation studies. For the last 12 years, she has been a community organizer and project coordinator in women’s health associations in Quebec (Canada). She has written several articles and directed two documentaries, all related to women’s health issues.

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Anna Bogic (University of Ottawa, Canada)
Anna Bogic holds a PhD in Women’s Studies and a Master’s in Translation Studies from the University of Ottawa, Canada. Her doctoral research examines the politics of translation and feminist knowledge production in the case of the Serbian translation of the American feminist health classic, Our Bodies, Ourselves. Her Master’s thesis focused on the first English translation of Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex and sociology of translation. Her research interests include feminist translation studies, sociology of translation, women’s reproductive health, feminism in post-socialist Eastern Europe, and translations of Simone de Beauvoir’s philosophy.

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Seyhan Bozkurt (Okan University, Turkey)
Seyhan Bozkurt was born in Istanbul in 1980 and received her BA, MA and PhD degrees in Translation Studies from Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. She is currently Assistant Professor of Translation Studies at Okan University. The title of her PhD dissertation was The Canonization and Popularization of Realism in Turkish Literary Discourse through Translation: A Conceptual-Historical Approach. Her MA thesis, Tracing Discourse in Prefaces to Turkish Translations of Fiction Published by Remzi Publishing House in the 1930s and 1940, was published in 2010 by LAP Lambert Academic Publishing. She has presented papers at international conferences such as TRASLATA (2011) and the Third Translation Traditions Conference (2008), Beyond Linguistic Plurality: The Trajectories of Multilingualism in Translation (2016) and Retranslation in Context III (2017). Her current research interests are translation history, translation theory, literary translation, paratexts, agents in translation, conceptual transfer, discourse analysis, periodicals, translation and ideology. Dr Bozkurt is also a translator.

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Julia C. Bullock (Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA)
Julia C. Bullock is Associate Professor of Japanese Studies at Emory University, in Atlanta, Georgia. Her research interests include gender and sexuality studies, feminist theory, and Japanese women’s literature and history. She is the author of The Other Women’s Lib: Gender and Body in Japanese Women’s Fiction, 1960-1973 (University of Hawai’i Press, 2010), and has recently completed a monograph on the impact of coeducation on postwar Japanese gender roles, entitled Coeds Ruining the Nation. She is currently researching a book on the Japanese reception of Simone de Beauvoir’s The Second Sex.

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Jan Buts (University of Manchester, UK)
Jan Buts is a PhD candidate at the University of Manchester’s Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, and a participant in its Genealogies of Knowledge project. He is currently conducting corpus-linguistic analyses of the recent linguistic trajectory of key concepts pertaining to the body politic.

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María Calzada-Pérez (Universitat Jaume I, Castellón de la Plana, Spain)
María Calzada-Pérez is Full Professor of Translation Studies at the Universitat Jaume I. Her research focuses on corpus-based translation studies, institutional translation (especially translation at the European Parliament), translation paedagogy, ideology, and advertising. She is Principal Coordinator of the ECPC (European Comparable and Parallel Corpora of Parliamentary Speeches) research group. She has produced books and papers such as (i) Calzada-Pérez, María (2007) Transitivity in Translating: The Interdependence of Texture and Context, Bern: Peter Lang; (ii) Calzada-Pérez, María (2010) ‘Learning from Obama and Clinton: Using Individuals’ Corpora in the Classroom’ in M. Moreno Jaén et al. (eds) Exploring New Paths in Language Pedagogy, London: Equinox, 191-212; and (ii) Calzada-Pérez, María (2017) ‘Five Turns of the Screw. A CADS analysis of the European Parliament’, Journal of Language and Politics: Online-First articles. She is also editor of volumes such as: Calzada-Pérez, María (2003) Apropos of Ideology, Manchester: St. Jerome.

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Leo Tak-hung Chan (Lingnan University, Hong Kong)
Leo Tak-hung Chan is Professor of Translation and Head of the Department of Translation, Lingnan University, Hong Kong. His articles have appeared in Harvard Journal of Asiatic Studies, Translation and Interpreting Studies, Translation Studies in the New Millennium, Perspectives, Comparative Literature Studies, Translation Studies, TTR, and The Translator, among other journals. His major scholarly publications include: One into Many: Translation and the Dissemination of Classical Chinese Literature (Rodopi Editions, 2003); Twentieth-Century Chinese Translation Theory: Modes, Issues and Debates (John Benjamins, 2004) and Readers, Reading and Reception of Translated Prose Fiction in Chinese: Novel Encounters (St. Jerome, 2010).

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David Charlston (University of Manchester, UK)
Dr David Charlston, MMus, MITI, MCIOL is a freelance translator and independent researcher. He completed his PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester in 2012 and has recently been appointed Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies in Manchester (CTIS). He is currently helping with the corpus-building phase of the Genealogies of Knowledge project. His personal research relates to the influence of retranslations of German philosophy on the shaping and dissemination of liberal political theory. He has published work in The Translator and in Radical Philosophy, and is currently writing a monograph for Routledge Advances in Translation and Interpreting Studies on the life and work of A. V. Miller, who retranslated six Hegel titles during the cold-war era. He is a member of the Hegel Society of Great Britain and the Hegel Society of America.

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I-Hsin Chen (Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
I-Hsin Chen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Translation at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where she has spent one year conducting research on the translation of key Chinese cultural concepts as a postdoctoral fellow. She received her Ph.D. in Translation and Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester, UK. Her doctoral thesis discussed religion, dialogism and intertextuality in James Legge’s translation of the Confucian Analects. She has published articles in various journals, including Translation Studies, International Communication of Chinese Culture, Translation and Interpreting Studies (forthcoming 2017), and Journal of Translation Studies (forthcoming 2017). Her research interests include translation studies, Chinese studies, philosophy and religious studies, and cross-cultural communication.

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Glen Cooper (Claremont McKenna College/Pitzer College, USA)
Glen M. Cooper was recently visiting assistant professor of history at Claremont McKenna College. He teaches courses in history and religion, including Middle East, Medieval Europe, Byzantium, India, Qur’an, and history of science and medicine. He holds an undergraduate degree in mathematical physics, but has pursued advanced studies in languages and Islamic scientific civilization at Oxford and Columbia, with a Ph.D. from the latter. He has published on the transmission of medical and astronomical concepts from Greek into Arabic, and from Arabic into Latin and beyond. His Arabic edition and study of Galen’s treatise on the medical critical days (De diebus decretoriis) is a basis for study of the interaction of medicine and astrology through the Renaissance. His current projects are: a study of the body politic metaphor in Greek, Arabic, Byzantine Greek, and Latin, and a study of the foundations of astrology and medicine in the Abbasid period.

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Anna Maria D’Amore (Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Mexico)
Anna Maria D’Amore is a senior lecturer at the Autonomous University of Zacatecas (UAZ) in Mexico where she currently teaches English reading comprehension and translation courses to students in the Literature and Linguistics undergraduate programme. Leader of the “Language and Literature” Research Group and a member of the Mexican National System of Researchers (SNI), she is involved in various translation-related research projects and activities as well as supervising undergraduate dissertations and postgraduate theses on translation in several departments of the university. She is the author of Translating Contemporary Mexican Texts: Fidelity to Alterity (2009), the editor/translator of the Spanish-English bilingual anthology Voces Zacatecanas/Zacatecan Voices (2012), a collection of short stories and poems written in Zacatecas, Mexico, and more recently of contributions to Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series – Themes in Translation Studies (2016) and the Handbook of research on teaching methods in language translation and interpretation (Cui & Zhao, 2015).

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Christina Delistathi (Birkbeck, University of London / City, University of London, UK)
Christina Delistathi’s research focuses on the translation of political texts by counter-hegemonic institutions and activist networks. She has published on the translations of the Communist Manifesto into Greek, and on the construction of Marxist discourse within the context of power struggles for the control of Marxist theory. Her current research interests include the study of politically engaged translators’ working practices and the effects of these on translated texts and discourses, as well as the study of academic writing through a historical perspective.

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Tansel Demirel (Boğaziçi University, Turkey)
Tansel Demirel is a PhD student in the Department of Translation Studies at Boğaziçi University, Istanbul. He currently works as an instructor at Okan University, Istanbul. He has worked as a translator and editor for a number of Turkish publishing houses. His translations into Turkish include The Politics and Poetics of Translation in Turkey, 1923- 1960 by Şehnaz Tahir Gürçağlar; Evliya Çelebi in Diyarbekir, edited by Boeschoten and van Bruinessen; The Great War and the 20th Century edited by Winter, Parker and Habeck; Poetry’s Voice, Society’s Song by Walter Andrews; Ottoman Manufacturing in the Age of the Industrial Revolution by Donald Quataert, and Masami Arai’s Turkish Nationalism in the Young Turk Era.

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Martí Domínguez (Universitat de València, Spain)
Martí Domínguez is Professor of Journalism at Universitat de València, Spain. He holds a PhD in Biology and has a background as researcher in media and science communication. He leads The Two Cultures Observatory, a multidisciplinary research group that focuses on the relationships between scientists and the media. He has published widely in the areas of visual communication, metaphors and knowledge exchange between scientists and the public.

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Joris van Eijnatten (Utrecht University, Netherlands)
As a cultural historian, Joris van Eijnatten (Department of History and Art History, Utrecht University) works on various interrelated fields, including the history of ideas, religion, media and communication. His research involves source material ranging from the eighteenth century to the present. Joris is an editor of the open-access journal HCM, the International Journal for History, Culture and Modernity. His current projects involve digital humanities research into popular conceptions of Europe and modernity in twentieth-century newspapers.

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Ahmed Elimam (University of Leicester, UK)
Dr Ahmed Elimam obtained his PhD in Translation Studies from the University of Manchester in 2009. He is currently a lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Leicester, where he teaches translation theory and practice at undergraduate and postgraduate levels. Dr Elimam previously taught at the University of St Andrews and the University of Manchester. His research interests lie in the areas of Arabic literary translation, Qur’an Translation, and Translation and Ideology. He is particularly interested in the stylistic challenges that translators of Arabic in general and the Qur’an in particular come across and the total effect of their choices on their respective output. His recent publications include: ‘Translating the Qur’an into English: Target Readers’ Expectations’ (2017), ‘The Translation of the Qur’an: Different Loyalties’ (2014) and ‘Marked Word Order in the Qur’an and its English Translations: Patterns and Motivations’ (2013).

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Jonathan Evans (University of Portsmouth, UK)
Jonathan Evans is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Portsmouth. He is author of The Many Voices of Lydia Davis (EUP, 2016) and co-editor of The Routledge Handbook of Translation and Politics (forthcoming 2018). He has published articles in journals such as Journal of Adaptation in Film and Performance, Translation Studies, Journal of Specialised Translation, Translation and Literature, and TTR.

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Fruela Fernández (Newcastle University, UK)
Fruela Fernández is a writer, translator, and academic, currently based at Newcastle University (UK). His research focuses mainly on the political uses and effects of cultural products from a transnational perspective. He has published a monograph —Espacios de dominación, espacios de resistencia (Peter Lang, 2014)— and edited two collective volumes on popular music: The Smiths: música, política y deseo (2014) and Joy Division: placers y trastornos (forthcoming). With Jonathan Evans, he is currently co-editing the Routledge Handbook of Translation and Politics. As activist translator and interpreter, he has volunteered for activist networks such as Plan C, ATTAC, and Climat 21. A multi-awarded poet, he has published three books in Spanish —Una paz europea (2016), Folk (2013), and Círculos (2000)— and co-directed Cosmopoética, an international poetry festival that won the Reading Promotion Award of the Spanish Ministry of Culture in 2009.

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Susan Fitzmaurice (University of Sheffield, UK)
Susan Fitzmaurice (University of Sheffield) is the leader of Linguistic DNA Project (@LinguisticDNA | linguisticdna.org), a collaborative research project supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (project H/M00614X/1), involving the Universities of Sheffield, Glasgow, and Sussex. Professor Fitzmaurice serves on the Council of the Philological Society, co-edits the Journal of Historical Pragmatics, and is a founding editorial board member of the Journal of Historical Sociolinguistics. Her research centres on the history of the English language, historical pragmatics, and historical sociolinguistics.

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Antje Flüchter (Universität Bielefeld, Germany)
Antje Flüchter is Full Professor in Early Modern History at the University of Bielefeld (Germany). In 2002 she earned her doctorate with a thesis entitled Church Politics and Everyday Life in Jülich and Berg in the 16th and 17th century, University of Münster. Between 2008-2012 she led a research group about transcultural statehood at the Heidelberg Cluster of Excellency Asia and Europe in a Global Context and, during 2012-2015, she led another project about Jesuit missionaries and transcultural christianities at the same institution. In 2012 she earned her habilitation at Heidelberg University with a book entitled Representations of Indian Statehood in the German Speaking Discourse. Prof Flüchter has published several works and articles on early modern global history, the history of the confessional age in the Holy Roman Empire and in India, the history of knowledge and gender history.

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Ralf Futselaar (NIOD / Erasmus University, Rotterdam, Netherlands)
Ralf Futselaar (1976) is a researcher at the NIOD: Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies (NIOD) and a lecturer at Erasmus University, Rotterdam. He has been studying the history of punishment since 2015. He has previously published on the history of hunger, child mortality, infectious disease, war traumas, crises, rationing, price controls, poverty and crime.

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Isabel García-Izquierdo (Universitat Jaume I, Castelló de la Plana, Spain)
Isabel García-Izquierdo is a Full Professor at Universitat Jaume I (Castelló de la Plana, Spain), where she teaches discourse analysis and applied linguistics for translation purposes. She is the Director of the GENTT (Textual Genres for Translation) research group, and a member of the IULMA (Instituto Interuniversitario de Lenguas Modernas Aplicadas). She has published widely in the fields of applied linguistics and translation studies, in particular on expert-to-lay translation and communication in healthcare settings.

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Benjamin Geer (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Benjamin Geer is a Research Fellow in the Digital Humanities Lab at the University of Basel. His research has focused on nationalism, intellectuals, and social movements in Egypt. He has served as Visiting Assistant Professor and Associate Director of the Middle East Studies Center at the American University in Cairo, and has taught Arabic at the University of Tübingen. He did his PhD in Middle East Studies at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London.

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Rainer Guldin (Università della Svizzera Italiana, Switzerland)
Rainer Guldin studied English and German Literature in Zürich and Birmingham (England). His PhD thesis focused on Hubert Fichte. He is lecturer for German Language and Culture at the Faculty of Communication at the Università della Svizzera Italiana in Lugano (Switzerland). He taught courses and held seminars at the Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, the Bauhaus Universität in Weimar (Germany), the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies of the University of Manchester (England) and the University of St. Gallen (Switzerland). He was visiting professor at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Belo Horizonte (Brazil). He is Editor-in-Chief of the peer-reviewed open access e-journal Flusser Studies http://www.flusserstudies.net/. Areas of research: metaphor theory; translation and self-translation; multilingual literature, history of the body; landscape theory. Recent publications: Vilém Flusser (1920-1991). Ein Leben in der Bodenlosigkeit. Biographie (forthcoming); Translation as Metaphor, New York 2016; Politische Landschaften. Zum Verhältnis von Raum und nationaler Identität, Bielefeld 2014.

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Ting Guo (University of Exeter, UK)
Ting Guo is Lecturer in the Department of Modern Languages, University of Exeter. She is the author of Surviving Violent Conflicts: Chinese Interpreters in the Second-Sino Japanese War (1931-45) (2016). She has published in journals such as Literature CompassTranslation Studies and Translation Quarterly.

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Sameh Hanna (University of Leeds, UK)
Sameh Hanna is a Lecturer in Arabic Literature and Translation and currently the director of Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies at University of Leeds. After completing his PhD on the Arabic translations of Shakespeare’s tragedies, he joined University College London as an Andrew Mellon Fellow where he further developed his research into Bourdieu’s sociology of cultural production and its implications for translation. His book, Bourdieu in Translation Studies: The Socio-cultural Dynamics of Shakespeare Translation in Egypt was published in 2016. His research expertise is in the intersection of a number of diverse fields, including Arabic literature, translation studies, theatre studies, religious studies and the sociology of culture. His current research interest is in the socio-cultural histories of the Arabic translations/adaptations/rewritings of such canonical texts as Shakespeare’s work and the Bible. Dr Hanna is a founding member of the International Association of Translation and Intercultural Studies.

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Pauline Henry-Tierney (Newcastle University, UK)
Pauline Henry-Tierney is a lecturer in French and Translation Studies at Newcastle University, UK. She was awarded her doctorate in French Studies from the University of Manchester in December 2015. Her thesis, currently being revised for publication as a monograph, is entitled, Transgressive Textualities: Translating Gender, Sexuality and Corporeality in Contemporary French and Francophone Women’s Writing. Research interests include post-2000 autofictional women’s writing in French, feminist translation, and theories of gender and sexuality. Recent publications include an article on translating gender and sexuality in Nelly Arcan’s texts and a book chapter on translation and sexual alterity.

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Tania P. Hernández-Hernández (El Colegio de México – Cátedras CONACyT, Mexico)
Tania P. Hernández-Hernández is a lecturer in Translation Studies at El Colegio de México, and a Cátedras-CONACyT researcher. She holds a PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester, UK, with a thesis on the role of translation in the internationalization of the press. Her research interests lie in the fields of sociology of translation, and translation and cultural production.

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Iona C. Hine (University of Sheffield, UK)
Iona C. Hine (University of Sheffield) is a Postdoctoral Research Associate on the Linguistic DNA Project (@LinguisticDNA | linguisticdna.org), a collaborative research project supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (project H/M00614X/1), involving the Universities of Sheffield, Glasgow, and Sussex. Dr Hine studies the contexts of semantic change, having completed a PhD in early modern Bible translation (Sheffield, 2014).

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Philipp Hofeneder (University of Graz, Austria)
Philipp Hofeneder is a postdoctoral researcher at the Karl-Franzens-University in Graz/Austria and currently writes his habilitation about translation culture(s) in communist reigned countries. He specializes in multilingual and pluriethnic empires such as the Habsburg monarchy, the Russian tsardom and the Soviet Union. Recent publications include Die mehrsprachige Ukraine. Übersetzungspolitik in der Sowjetunion von 1917 bis 1991 (2013); ‘Der lange Schatten imperialer Historiografie. Karamzins ‘Geschichte des russischen Reiches’ in Übersetzungen’, Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 65:4 (2016); ‘Das Übersetzungswesen im kommunistischen Polen zwischen Dominanz und Vielfalt (1944–91) ’, Babel 62:2 (2016); ‘Sowjetische Translationskultur. Das Übersetzungswesen als ein Instrument der Heterogenisierung’, in Schippel and Zwischenberger (eds) Going East: Discovering New and Alternative Traditions in Translation Studies (2017).

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Christopher Hollings (University of Oxford, UK)
Christopher Hollings is Departmental Lecturer in Mathematics and its History at the Oxford Mathematical Institute, and a Senior Research Fellow of The Queen’s College, Oxford. He obtained a PhD in Mathematics from the University of York in 2007, and has subsequently worked both in mathematics and in its history. His research focuses in particular on the development of abstract algebra during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; his book Mathematics across the Iron Curtain: A History of the Algebraic Theory of Semigroups (American Mathematical Society 2014) details the emergence of one branch of modern algebra. Other interests include the communications (or lack thereof) between mathematicians on opposite sides of the Iron Curtain during the Cold War (surveyed in his book Scientific Communication across the Iron Curtain, Springer 2016), and the translation of mathematics across language barriers.

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Pim Huijnen (Utrecht University, Netherlands)
Pim Huijnen is Assistant Professor for Cultural History at Utrecht University. He did a PhD in the history of science at the University of Amsterdam on conceptualizations of vitamins in prewar Netherlands (2011). He has been involved as a postdoctoral researcher in different digital humanities projects at Utrecht University, among which Translantis: Digital Humanities Approaches to Reference Cultures. The United States in Dutch Public Discourse, 1890-1990. His interests and expertise are in digital conceptual history and the methodological implications of digitization for historical scholarship.

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Shahrzad Irannejad (Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany)
Shahrzad Irannejad is a PhD candidate at the interdisciplinary Research Training Group “Early Concepts of Man and Nature: Universal, Local, Borrowed”, Mainz, Germany. In her current thesis project “Localization of the Avicennean inner senses in a Hippocratic body”, she tracks the Hellenistic roots of the medieval theory of Inner Senses in the framework of humoral medicine in the Arabic-speaking world. Her research deals with how knowledge is transformed as it is borrowed and transferred beyond linguistic and ideological borders.

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Hephzibah Israel (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Hephzibah Israel is Lecturer in Translation Studies, University of Edinburgh. Her research interests include translation and religion, literary translation, literary practice and translation in South Asia. She recently led an AHRC-funded collaborative research project under their ‘Translating Cultures’ theme which focused on the role of translation in the movement of religious concepts across languages and the ways in which this impacts religious conversion and autobiographical writing about conversion experiences. She has authored several articles and her monograph entitled Religious Transactions in Colonial South India (2011) offers an analysis of the translated Bible as an object of cultural transfer in South Asia in the context of evolving attitudes to translation in the Tamil sacred landscapes from the eighteenth century. She is guest editing a special issue on Religion and Translation for the journal Religion (with Matthias Frenz) and a special issue on Indian traditions of life writing on religious conversion for the journal South Asia (with John Zavos).

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Henry Jones (University of Manchester, UK)
Henry Jones is a Post-Doctoral Research Associate at the University of Manchester’s Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies (UK). Having recently completed his PhD research focusing on translation in the context of Wikipedia, he is now working as part of a multi-disciplinary team on the AHRC-funded Genealogies of Knowledge project.

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Bryan Jurish (Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities, Germany)
Bryan Jurish is a researcher at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities. He received a B.A. in Philosophy and Cognitive Science from Northwestern University in 1996, where he was awarded the Daniel Bonbright Scholar award for excellence in the humanities. His subsequent study of Computational Linguistics at the Universität Potsdam led to a Diplom in 2002 and a PhD in 2011. His research interests include diachronic computational linguistics, automated spelling correction for historical and non-standard text, theory and applications of weighted finite state automata, noise-tolerant stochastic models for natural language processing tasks, and formal language models of musical structure.

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Ji-Hae Kang (Ajou University, Republic of Korea)
Ji-Hae Kang is Professor of Translation Studies at the Department of English Language and Literature and Director of Ajou Center for Translation and Interpreting Studies (ACTIS) at Ajou University, South Korea. Her research focuses on translation and interpreting in institutional settings, issues of power, identity and discourse in transnational exchanges, and the interplay between translation and digital culture.

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Kyung Hye Kim (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)
Kyung Hye Kim is a Lecturer in Translation Studies at the School of Foreign Languages, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and a member of the Baker Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies. She holds a PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester. Her academic interests lie in corpus-based translation studies, critical discourse analysis, and the application of narrative theory to translation and interpreting.

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Boya Li (University of Ottawa, Canada)
Boya Li is pursuing a Master’s Degree in Feminist and Gender Studies at the University of Ottawa, and her research project examines the translation and dissemination of Western feminist discourse in other social and linguistic contexts. She obtained an Honours Bachelor’s Degree in Gender/Women’s Studies at the University of Victoria in 2016. Her research interests include the impact of globalization on knowledge production, feminist translation theories and practices, gender and reproduction politics in Mainland China, and translation as a social phenomenon.

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Dang Li (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)
Dang Li is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at the School of Foreign Languages, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and a member of the Baker Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies. She holds a PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester and an MA in Applied Translation Studies from the University of Leeds. Her research interests lie mainly in audiovisual translation, non-professional subtitling, and corpus-based translation studies.

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Nannan Liu (University of Mainz, Germany)
Nannan Liu studied German Language & Literature and History of Art at Peking University, and received her postgraduate degree in Translation Studies from Johannes Gutenberg University of Mainz, Germany. She is currently pursuing a doctorate in the PhD programme ‘Politik der Translation’ at the FTSK of the University of Mainz. Her main research interests include translation theories, translation of philosophy and politics of translation.

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Sofia Malamatidou (University of Birmingham, UK)
Sofia Malamatidou is a Lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Birmingham, UK. She holds a degree in English Language from the University of Athens and an MA and PhD in Translation and Intercultural Studies from the University of Manchester. Her research combines corpus-linguistics, translation studies, and contact linguistics. She has published extensively on the topic of translation-induced linguistic change in the target language and has also examined how the genre of popular science has developed in Greece through translations from English. Her recent monograph focuses on the development of a new methodological framework, based on corpus triangulation, for the investigation of a range of translation-related phenomena. Her research interests also include cross-cultural pragmatics, especially with regards to tourist texts, and the development of a methodology for the investigation of large electronic collections of visual material.

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Joana Malta (Universidade Nova de Lisboa / Universidade dos Açores, Portugal)
Joana Malta has a licentiate degree in sociology and a master’s degree in data analysis. Between 2008 and 2015, she worked as a senior statistician at the National Statistical Office, Having been granted a scholarship from the Science and Technology Foundation, she then began a PhD in the History of Ideas with a project in the field of Digital Humanities entitled From Historical Narrative to Digital History: The digital edition of the magazine A Águia.

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Alison E. Martin (University of Reading, UK)
Dr Alison E. Martin works as a Lecturer in the Department of Modern Languages and European Studies at the University of Reading (UK). She has published widely on nineteenth-century science, translation and knowledge exchange, and has co-edited two journal special issues on women as facilitators of scientific knowledge exchange in the Victorian period. Her second monograph (forthcoming, 2018) explores the translation and reception of Alexander von Humboldt’s writing in nineteenth-century Britain. She is currently working on a third monograph project which explores the transnational reach of British modernist writers, notably Vita Sackville-West, in twentieth- and twenty first-century Europe.

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Cláudia S. Martins (Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil)
Cláudia Santana Martins holds a Doctor of Letters degree in Linguistic and Literary Studies in English from the Faculty of Philosophy, Letters and Human Sciences (USP), where she is now a post-doctoral researcher in Translation Studies. She is also a professional translator, working from French and English into Brazilian Portuguese, and has extensive experience as a translator in a variety of fields, including literature, arts, history, sociology, philosophy, mathematics, and computer science.

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Julia Martins (The Warburg Institute, UK)
Julia Martins is a PhD student at the Warburg Institute in London, working under the supervision of Guido Giglioni and Joanne Anderson. She did her BA in History in Brazil, and after that, she moved to Europe to pursue a double MA in French and Italian history at the University of Paris Diderot and the University of Bologna. Her doctoral research focus is early modern recipes about female fertility and reproduction contained in Italian books of secrets and English midwifery manuals. She aims to demonstrate how these books circulated in translations and re-editions, shaping early modern understandings of the body, and influencing contemporary medical practices. Julia argues that the dialogue between these two genres, books of secrets and midwifery manuals, can give us interesting insight into how medical knowledge circulated in the early modern period, influencing gender roles and medical culture.

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James Maxey (Nida School of Translation Studies, USA)
James Maxey is Associate Dean and Director of Translation Services for the Nida Institute and Dean of Faculty for the Nida School of Translation Studies. He has been involved in translation work in Africa for more than 25 years. His research interests include performance and translation as well as cultural studies. In addition to numerous journal articles, he is the author of From Orality to Orality: A New Paradigm for Contextual Translation of the Bible (Wipf & Stock 2009) and co-editor of Translating Scripture for Sound and Performance: New Directions in Biblical Studies (Wipf & Stock 2012).

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Timothy McLellan (Cornell University, USA)
Tim is a PhD candidate in anthropology at Cornell University. Based on 2 years of participant observation at an agri-environmental research organization in Southwest China, his thesis explores the managerial and bureaucrat demands that various domestic and international institutions place upon contemporary scientists. Tim is currently writing up, and expects to graduate in 2018. He has a B.A. in Law and Chinese from The School of Oriental and African Studies, and an MSc in Law and Anthropology from The London School of Economics.

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Seth Mehl (University of Sheffield, UK)
Seth Mehl (University of Sheffield) is a Postdoctoral Research Associate on the Linguistic DNA Project (@LinguisticDNA | linguisticdna.org), a collaborative research project supported by the UK Arts and Humanities Research Council (project H/M00614X/1), involving the Universities of Sheffield, Glasgow, and Sussex. Dr Mehl completed a PhD in English (UCL, 2015), and his current work focuses on corpus semantics and corpus methodology.

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Vicent Montalt (Universitat Jaume I, Castelló de la Plana, Spain)
Vicent Montalt is a Senior Lecturer at Universitat Jaume I (Castelló de la Plana, Spain), where he teaches medical, scientific and technical translation. He is the Director of the Master’s Programme in Medical Translation, and leads the TradMed research group on medical translation. He is also a member of the GENTT (Textual Genres for Translation) research group and of IULMA (Instituto Interuniversitario de Lenguas Modernas Aplicadas). He is the author of Manual de traducció científicotècnica (2005) and co-author of Medical Translation Step by Step. Learning by drafting (2007).

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Jasper Montana (University of Cambridge, UK)
Jasper Montana works on evidence, expertise and policymaking for environmental governance. His research draws on diverse disciplinary traditions, including human geography, organizational studies and political science, but is tied most centrally to the theoretical and methodological approaches of science and technology studies. From this perspective, his recent research has explored the place of expert authority in knowledge and policy institutions, and the means through which recent developments in transdisciplinarity and Anthropocene science perturb these systems of environmental governance.

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Jose Murgatroyd Cree (University of Sheffield, UK)
Jose Murgatroyd Cree is a PhD candidate at the University of Sheffield working on The Invention of Addiction in Early Modern England, supervised by Phil Withington at the University of Sheffield and Tania Demetriou at the University of York. Her interdisciplinary project is funded by the White Rose College of Arts and Humanities (WRoCAH) as part of a network on Cultures of Consumption in Early Modern Europe. Jose completed an MA in Early Modern History at the University of Sheffield in 2012, and a BA in History at the same institution in 2009.

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Verónica Murillo Gallegos (Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Mexico)
Verónica del Carmen Murillo Gallegos is a senior lecturer at the New Spain Studies Doctoral Programme at the Autonomous University of Zacatecas (UAZ), Mexico. She has taught Philosophy of language, Philosophy and literature, and the Philosophy of New Spain at undergraduate level, both at the Philosophy and the Literature and Linguistics Departments. Her research interests focus on the Philosophy of culture and Philosophy of New Spain and she collaborates in the areas of “Society and thought” and “Ruptures and continuities” as part of her work in New Spain Studies in the UAZ. She has been a member of the Mexican National System of Researchers (SNI) since 2008. She is the author of Cultura, lenguaje y evangelización. Nueva España, siglo XVI (Porrúa, 2012) y Palabras de evangelización, problemas de traducción (UAZ, 2009) and more recently she has published in Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series – Themes in Translation Studies (2016).

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Maret Nieländer (Georg Eckert Institute for International Textbook Research, Germany)
Maret Nieländer studied cultural sciences at the European-University Viadrina (Frankfurt/Oder, Germany), conducting further Studies in Oviedo (Spain) and practical training in South Africa, Spain, and Mexico. At the University of Heidelberg, Nieländer worked as a research assistant on the project ‚The Dialogue of Cultures in the Andes‘ for the Transcultural Studies programme. She completed her doctoral thesis on the role of the Mercedarian order in the emergence of colonial society in Central and South America in the faculty of history in 2013. In 2014 she joined the Georg Eckert Institute – Leibniz-Institute for International Textbook Research (GEI) as a research fellow in the department for Digital Information and Research Infrastructures. She coordinates the field of Digital Humanities at the GEI as well as the CLARIN-D discipline-specific working group on history that is led by the ZZF Potsdam and the GEI.

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John Ødemark (University of Oslo, Norway)
John Ødemark is Associate Professor of Cultural History. His main research theme is cultural translation, the translation of knowledge and early modern encounters between Europe and America, and the history of the human sciences. His doctoral dissertation examined cultural translation and early modern cultural encounters, and his post-doctoral project was concerned with Amazonia as a topos in cultural theory, ethno-politics and popular culture. Ødemark has ample experience in research collaboration and research management as a PI in a range of projects, including The Body in Translation – Challenging and Reinventing Medical Knowledge Translation (with E. Engebretsen, University of Oslo) and ‘The Body in Translation – Early Modern Cultural Translation and the Constitution of the Human Sciences (with Michael Wintroub, University of California Berkeley). He has been a keynote speaker at the annual conferences of the Association of Authorised Translators in Norway and the Non-fiction Writers and Translators Organization.

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Maeve Olohan (University of Manchester, UK)
Maeve Olohan is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies and Co-Director of the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester, UK. Her recent research has focused both on the translation of science in 19th-century Europe and on the workplace practices of today’s translation professionals. Significant areas of focus in these studies are the socialities and materialities of translation, and her forthcoming monograph explores theoretical and empirical approaches for studying translation in practice-theoretical terms. Her research has been published in leading journals in translation studies, the history of science and ethnography. She is author of Scientific and Technical Translation (2016) and Introducing Corpora in Translation Studies (2004), editor of Intercultural Faultlines: Research Models in Translation Studies (2000) and co-editor, with Myriam Salama-Carr, of a special issue of The Translator (2011) on the translation of science.

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Agnieszka Pantuchowicz (University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warsaw, Poland)
Agnieszka Pantuchowicz teaches literature, gender studies and translation at the University of Social Sciences and Humanities in Warsaw, Poland. She has published numerous articles on literary criticism, theoretical aspects of translation as well as on cultural and ideological dimensions of translation in the Polish context. She is also engaged in research within the field of gender studies and the work of contemporary Polish women writers. Her research interests are translation studies, comparative literature and feminist criticism.

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Manuel Pavón-Belizón (Universitat Oberta de Catalunya, Spain)
Manuel Pavón-Belizón is a PhD candidate at the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (Barcelona), and a member of its ALTER research group. He holds a BA in Translation and Interpreting from the University of Granada (2006), and a MA in Chinese Studies from Pompeu Fabra University (2014). He specialized in Chinese at Beijing Jiaotong University and Beijing Foreign Studies University (2006-2009). As part of his current research, focused on the transnational circulation and reception of contemporary Chinese thought, he held a research fellowship at Peking University (2016). His main research interests are Chinese contemporary intellectual history and literature, translation history, and the transnational circulation of cultural productions. He is also a Chinese to Spanish translator.

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Susan Pickford (Université Paris-Sorbonne, France)
Dr. Susan Pickford is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies in the English department at the Université Paris-Sorbonne. She has published widely on the history of translation from the eighteenth century to the present, including a chapter on professional translation in the nineteenth century for the five-volume Histoire des traductions en langue française. Her particular research interests are the professional sociology of translators past and present and the interface between Translation Studies and Book History.

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Myriam Salama-Carr (University of Manchester, UK)
Myriam Salama-Carr is Senior Research Fellow at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester. Her research focuses on the history of translation, with particular focus on the translation of science and the transmission of knowledge. She is the author of La Traduction à l’époque abasside (Didier Erudition 1990) and the editor of Translating and Interpreting Conflict (Rodopi 2007) and of a special issue of Social Semiotics on Translation and Conflict (2007). She has co-edited a special issue of Forum (2009) on Ideology and Cross-Cultural Encounters, and of The Translator (2011) on Science in Translation. She is investigator in a QNRF-funded project on the construction of an anthology of the Arabic Discourse on Translation (2015-2018) and co-editor of a Handbook on Languages at War (Palgrave series on Languages at War) to be published in 2018. She was the Director of the National Network for Translation (www.nationalnetworkfortranslation.ac.uk) from 2007 to 2017, and Chair of the Training Committee on IATIS (www.iatis.org) from 2011 to 2016.

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Laura V. Sández (Villanova University, USA)
Laura V. Sández is an Assistant Professor of Latin American literature and cultural studies at Villanova University. Her current study of emotions borrows from her work and research in the field of theatre. She holds an MA in Performance Studies from NYU and a PhD in Spanish Literature from City University of New York, CUNY-Graduate Center. Her research interests include history of concepts, history of emotions and Latin American culture and history. Overall, her research is concerned with the importance of emotions in discursive practices envisioning autonomy and agency.

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Tony Sandset (University of Oslo, Norway)
Tony Sandset is a postdoctoral researcher at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, where he received his PhD in Cultural History. His current research focuses on knowledge translation within the field of HIV care and prevention. Specifically his focus is on how medical knowledge from randomized controlled trials is mediated, how evidence is generated in HIV prevention and how new medical technologies informs subjectivities, desire, and sexuality. Another of his research areas pertains to the intersection between race, gender, class and HIV care and prevention. Relating race, class and gender to how medical knowledge is disseminated and translated from research to clinical and community usage is of particular interest here.

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Lucía Sapiña (Universitat de València, Spain)
Lucía Sapiña is a PhD candidate at Universitat de València, Spain. She holds a Master’s in the History of Science and Scientific Communication. She is a member of The Two Cultures Observatory, and has published on gaps in cancer knowledge, patient-doctor relationship, cancer and media, and illness metaphors.

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Tarek Shamma (Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar)
Tarek Shamma is an Assistant Professor at the Translation and Interpreting Institute, Hamad Bin Khalifa University, Qatar. He received his PhD in translation and comparative literature from the State University of New York at Binghamton in 2006. He has published on translation, comparative literature, and intercultural communication. He is a consultant editor on The Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies, Third Edition, and is a member of the editorial board of Forum: International Journal of Interpretation and Translation, John Benjamins. He is the author of Translation and the Manipulation of Difference: Arabic Literature in Nineteenth-Century England, published by St. Jerome in 2009.

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Ariel Shangguan (Newcastle University, UK)
Ariel Shangguan is a PhD candidate in International Politics at Newcastle University, UK. Her research interest lies primarily in the temporal-spatial conditionality of political knowledge and its translation.

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Gulnaz Sibgatullina (Leiden University, Netherlands)
Gulnaz Sibgatullina obtained her BA/MA degree at Moscow State Linguistic University (Russia). She is currently a PhD candidate working on a project entitled ‘Russian Language of Islam and the Russian Orthodox Church: Dialogue and Mission’ at the Centre for Linguistics at Leiden University (The Netherlands). Her main research interests include sociolinguistics and religious language, discourse and power, and the coexistence of several religious codes within one language.

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Eva Spišiaková (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Eva Spišiaková received a combined BA and MA degree in Japanese Language and Intercultural Communication from Comenius University in Bratislava, after which she spent a year at Tokyo University as an independent researcher focusing on early modern Japanese literature. In 2013, Eva moved to Scotland where she completed her MSc degree in Literary Translation as Creative Practice at the University of Edinburgh. She is currently a doctoral candidate in Translation Studies at the same university. Her research interests primarily include gender and particularly LGBTQ issues within translation studies, and she is likewise interested in questions of censorship and manipulation of translations under totalitarian regimes, especially within the countries of the former Eastern bloc.

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James St. André (The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong)
James St. André is Director of the Centre for Translation Technology and Associate Professor in the Department of Translation at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. Research interests include the history of Chinese-English translation, metaphors of translation, translation theory, and queer theory. He has published articles in various journals, including META, TTR, The Translator, Translation and Interpreting Studies, The Journal of Pragmatics, and Target. Book projects include Thinking through Translation with Metaphors (2010) and with Peng Hsiao-yen China and Its Others: Knowledge Transfer through Translation, 1829-2010; his book Translating China as Cross-identity Performance, which develops the queer metaphor of translation as cross-identity performance, is due out from Hawai’i University Press in 2017. His latest project, Conceptualizing China through Translation, examines how certain key concepts used to understand Chinese culture and society have developed interlingually between English and Chinese from the eighteenth through the 21st century.

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Jan Surman (University of Erfurt, Germany)
Jan Surman is currently Visiting Fellow at Max Weber Center, Erfurt and from October 2017 will be Research Fellow at the Internationales Forschungszentrum Kulturwissenschaften, Vienna. His research focuses on scientific transfer, academic mobility and scientific internationalism, and is currently working on a monograph on the history of scientific languages in Central Europe. Surman received his PhD in history from the University of Vienna in 2012. He has been a visiting scholar at the Department of History, Princeton University and a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the Herder Institute in Marburg. His publications include The Nationalization of Scientific Knowledge in the Habsburg Empire 1848–1918 (co-edited with M. G. Ash, Palgrave 2012); Language as a Scientific Tool: Shaping Scientific Language Across Time and National Traditions (co-edited with MacLeod, Smirnova and Sumillera, Routledge 2016); and ‘Wissenschaft als Übersetzung? Translation und Wandel polnischsprachiger Wissenschaft im langen 19. Jahrhundert’, Zeitschrift für Ostmitteleuropa-Forschung 65 (2016), H. 4 (editor).

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Şebnem Susam-Saraeva (University of Edinburgh, UK)
Şebnem Susam-Saraeva is a Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies at the University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. Her research interests have included gender and translation, retranslations, translation of literary and cultural theories, research methodology in translation studies, internationalization of the discipline, translation and popular music, and translation and social movements. She is the author of Translation and Popular Music. Transcultural intimacy in Turkish-Greek relations (2015) and Theories on the Move. Translation’s role in the travels of literary theories (2006), and guest-editor of Translation and Music (2008) and Non-Professionals Translating and Interpreting. Participatory and engaged perspectives (2012, with Luis Pérez-González). Beyond the University of Edinburgh, she is the Chair of the ARTIS Steering Committee (Advancing Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies).

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Mihael Švitek (Technical University Dresden, Germany)
Mihael Švitek (*1988) is Research Fellow at Technische Universität Dresden at the Department of Linguistic, Literature and Cultural studies and vice-director of the Dresden Center for Digital Linguistics. He is currently working on a doctoral thesis entitled Language and Ideology which will include a new methodological framework for the linguistic analysis of ideological concepts, having previously completed a master’s thesis on deconstructive interpretations in contemporary German gender linguistics. Mihael is currently teaching bachelor and master courses about Cultural and Political Linguistics and regularly gives guest lectures on different linguistic aspects of political history.

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Laura Tarkka-Robinson (University of Helsinki, Finland)
Laura Tarkka-Robinson is a Post-Doctoral Researcher at the University of Helsinki, Finland.   In her PhD thesis – centred on the role of Rudolf Erich Raspe (1736-1794) as a cultural mediator – she examined cultural transfer in the context of the Anglo-Hanoverian personal union. Her current research is affiliated with the COMHIS Collective and concerns the construction of national characters in Enlightenment discourse.

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Annarita Taronna (University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Italy)
Annarita Taronna has a PhD in Translation Studies from the University of Bari “Aldo Moro”, Italy. She currently is a Researcher in English and Translation at the Department of Education, Psychology and Communication. Her main research areas include gender and/in translation studies, cultural and postcolonial studies, African-American and Chicana languages and literatures, English as a lingua franca in migratory contexts and the teaching of English as a second language (ESL). She is currently working on a research project on “Language mediation, translating and interpreting from the ferries to the reception and detention camps across the Mediterranean” as a component of the Italian network “S/murare il Mediterraneo: pratiche politiche e poetiche di artivismo” (Un/walling the Mediterranean: political and poetic practices of artivism).  On these topics she has already published several articles: (2013) “In search of new sea(e)scapes: the metaphors of the Mediterranean from mythological to contemporary narratives (In: Covi, Giovanna and Marchi, Lisa, (eds) Democracy and Difference: The US in Multidisciplinary and Comparative Perspectives, p. 301-308, TRENTO:Labirinti); (2016) Translation, hospitality and conflict: language mediators as an activist community of practice across the Mediterranean. Linguistica Antverpiensia, New Series: Themes in Translation Studies, 14, 153-174.

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Franziska Toscher (Università degli Studi di Udine, Italy)
Franziska Toscher is a PhD student at the University of Udine under the supervision of Marella Magris (Università di Trieste) and Karl Gerhard Hempel (Università del Salento). She studied History and French Language, Literature and Culture at the University of Rostock (Germany), and received her MA in Translation and Cultural Mediation at the University of Udine. Her research interests concern the language of historiography as a special language, and the translation of historiographical papers from Italian to German with focus on the writer’s stance and its translation. She is also a freelance translator and a teacher for German as a foreign language in schools for professional and further education.

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Przemysław Uściński (University of Warsaw, Poland)
Przemysław Uściński is Assistant Professor at the Institute of English Studies, University of Warsaw. He is the author of Parody, Scriblerian Wit and the Rise of the Novel (Frankfurt am Main, London and New York: Peter Lang, 2016). He has published a number of articles on English literature, the history of the novel, the aesthetics of parody and translation. He is a member of the editorial board of Anglica. An International Journal of English Studies, a peer-reviewed journal published by the University of Warsaw. His research interests include literature, Queer Theory and Translation Studies, in particular the eighteenth-century literature and the Enlightenment, in connection with the discourses of queerness and deconstruction, and their genealogies.

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Milan van Lange (NIOD / Utrecht University, Netherlands)
Milan van Lange (1992) is currently working as an assistant and PhD candidate at the NIOD and Utrecht University. In his research project ‘War and Emotions’ he investigates emotional expressions in political and public debates related to World War II. He is especially interested in the use of text mining technologies in analysing digitized historical sources.

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Clare Vassallo (University of Malta, Malta)
A graduate of Philosophy, Linguistics and English Literature, Clare Vassallo pursued her interest in the interface of these three areas at the Istituto di Comunicazione, University of Bologna, Italy where she obtained her PhD in Semiotics under the tutorship of Prof Umberto Eco. The emphasis of her research was in the field of Semiotics as literary and cultural theory and as theory of knowledge. She is currently Associate Professor of Semiotics and Translation Studies in the Department of Translation Studies at the University of Malta. She teaches postgraduate courses in the Department of Translation Studies and in the MA Program on Popular Culture and Literary Tradition. Her courses include Translation History and Theory; Pragmatics, Semantics and Semiotics; Literary Translation; among others. She guest edited a Special Issue of the journal Semiotica, titled Umberto Eco’s Interpretative Semiotics: Interpretation, Encyclopedia, Translation, De Gruyter Mouton, 2015, vol. 206, issue 1/4.

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Jaap Verheul (Utrecht University, Netherlands)
Jaap Verheul is Associate Professor for Cultural History at Utrecht University. He is the initiator and coordinator of multiple digital humanities projects, including the NWO-funded Translantis: Digital Humanities Approaches to Reference Cultures. The United States in Dutch Public Discourse, 1890-1990; the HERA-funded Asymmetrical Encounters: Finding Reference Cultures in Europe, 1850-1990; and the Digging into Data project Oceanic Exchanges: Tracing Global Information Networks in Historical Newspaper Repositories, 1840-1914. His interests and expertise are in American perceptions of Europe and in digital conceptual history.

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Thomas Werneke (Centre for Contemporary History Potsdam, Germany)
Thomas Werneke is a historian at the Centre for Contemporary History Potsdam. He earned his Ph.D. in 2013 in the field of historical semantics by writing a conceptual history of human rights language during the Cold War. Since 2014 he has been coordinating a working group of historians within the CLARIN-D infrastructure project. His research interests include methodological approaches in the larger field of historical semantics. His current research project is a history of nutrition regimes in Germany during the 20th century.

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Sietse Wieringa (University of Oslo, Norway / University of Oxford, UK)
Sietse Wieringa is an academic GP, clinically active in Amsterdam and London. Dr Wieringa graduated with cum laude at Leiden University in the Netherlands and obtained a Master in Healthcare Management at the University of Rotterdam. He was a student of the Harvard Medical School Global Clinical Scholars Research Training programme and held a NIHR research fellowship at Queen Mary University in London. He is currently a research fellow at the Center for Health Sciences Education of the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Oslo and a DPhil student at the University of Oxford working with Professor Trisha Greenhalgh. He is also a standing committee member for the update of clinical guidelines at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in the UK and a member of the AID working group at the Guidelines International Network (GIN).

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Gerhard Wiesenfeldt (University of Melbourne, Australia)
Gerhard Wiesenfeldt is a Lecturer in the History of Science at the University of Melbourne. He holds an MSc in Physics and a PhD in History of Science, both from the University of Hamburg. He has published extensively on the history of experimental natural philosophy and the role of the sciences in early modern universities, with a focus on the Dutch Republic and protestant German countries. He is currently working on a book on the relation between practical mathematics and natural philosophy in the Dutch Republic. Recent publications include: (2016) ‘Academic Writings and the Rituals of Early Modern Universities’, Intellectual History Review, 26: 447-460; (2016) ‘Craftsmen, Merchants and Scholars: Hiring practices at the Universities of Leiden and Edinburgh, 1575–1750’ (with Aaron Mitchell), Yearbook for the European Culture of Science, 8: 163-187.

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Yifan Zhu (Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China)
Yifan Zhu has a PhD in Linguistics with a specialization in translation and contrastive studies of Chinese and English. She is Associate Professor at Shanghai Jiao Tong University and Associate Director of the Baker Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies. In addition to teaching and translating, Dr Zhu publishes in the fields of translation studies, contrastive linguistics and corpus-based translation studies. Her articles have appeared in journals such as Chinese Translator’s Journal, Journal of Foreign Languages, Journal of Foreign Language Teaching, Journal of PLA University of Foreign Languages and Foreign Languages Research. Her monograph The Influence of Translation on the Modern Chinese Language (1905-1936) was published in 2011 by the Foreign Language Teaching and Research Press.

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Krisztina Zimányi (Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico)
Krisztina Zimányi is a lecturer at the Department of Language of the University of Guanajuato (UG), Mexico where she has taught Psycholinguistics and Translation courses on the undergraduate and postgraduate English and Spanish teacher training programmes. In inter-departmental collaboration, she has been the principal investigator of a feasibility study and a regional state-of-the-art project of translation that has led to the establishment of a postgraduate Diploma in Translation at the UG. She has also supervised undergraduate theses on subjects related to translation. She is the author of a number of articles on mental healthcare interpreting in Ireland and, more recently, on the ethical implications of the visual representation of the Malinche as an interpreter in contemporary sources. In collaboration with the other two presenters, she has published on the translation of the collision of cosmovisions in New Spain. Her research interests include translator education, translation ethics and the relationship between agents in translation.

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