‘Developing and Translating Rights’ event

Developing and Translating Rights

A half-day event co-hosted by the Genealogies of Knowledge Project and the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester, UK

19 June 2018 | Ellen Wilkinson Building, University of Manchester

Programme Abstracts Registration Venue Contact

About the event

The concept of human rights, as enshrined in the UN Declaration of Human Rights, itself translated into more than 501 languages (www.un.org/en), has been gradually expanded to encompass a broad range of specific rights, including civil, cultural, economic, environmental and social rights. The growing focus on language rights, at the centre of multilingualism initiatives and situated language policies (Richter et al 2012), gives increased urgency to the provision of translation and interpreting in contexts where human rights are challenged and contested through actual practices and restrictions (Inghilleri and Harding 2010). In addition to the shifting interpretation of the principles of human rights, it is also increasingly argued that the notion of rights should be expanded further to apply to non-human animals. The animal rights debate is underpinned by centuries of philosophical thought, but scientific and measurable criteria are brought forward by activists and researchers who advocate that greater attention should be given to animal rights and welfare and that the exclusion of animals from theories of justice should be revisited (Garner 2013).

This event will explore how the concept of ‘rights’, as framed by the complexity of human rights law, is enacted and enabled beyond cultural and linguistic boundaries, through translation and interpreting, and can be articulated from different perspectives. It will also prompt new questions on the way the concept of rights can be extended to non-human animals when animal welfare gains in national and global contexts are seen by some as incremental steps towards animal rights.

The workshop will feature presentations from scholars as well as representatives of activist organisations.



Garner, Robert (2013) A Theory of Justice of Animals: Animal Rights in a nonideal world. Oxford University Press.

Inghilleri, Moira and Sue-Ann Harding (eds) (2010) Translation and Violent Conflict. The Translator 16(2).

Richter, Dagmar et al. (eds) (2012) Language Rights Revisited – The Challenges of Global Migration and Communication. Berlin: Wolf legal Publishers.

Provisional programme

19th June 2018
12:00-13:00 Registration and Lunch
13:00-13:45 Framing the event

– Myriam Salama-Carr (University of Manchester)

– Anne Walker (Amnesty International)

– Phil Brooke (Compassion in World Farming)

13:45-14:30 Kerri Woods (University of Leeds)

Towards a Feminist Account of Human Dignity 

14:30-15:15 Steve Cooke (University of Leicester)

Making Progress Towards Animal Rights

15:15-15:45 Coffee
15:45-16:30 Wine Tesseur (University of Reading)

Language as Part of Diversity and Inclusion: Establishing the missing link between language rights and human rights in the work of Amnesty International

16:30-17:15 Fabrizio Gallai (University of Bologna)

The Rights of Interpreters and Interpreter Users in Fragile Environments.

17:15-17:30 Closing Remarks


This event is free to attend. To register, please click on the link below to our Eventbrite page:

Register via Eventbrite


The event will take place in the Conference Room of the SALC Graduate School, Ellen Wilkinson Building, University of Manchester.




This event is being organised by Myriam Salama-Carr. If you have any queries about this event, please contact her at myriam.salama-carr@manchester.ac.uk 



This event is produced with the generous support of the following sponsors:



Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Arts and Languages (CIDRAL)