People

Research Team

Mona Baker

Mona BakerMona Baker is Emeritus Professor of Translation Studies at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester, UK, Principal Investigator on the AHRC-funded project Genealogies of Knowledge: The Evolution and Contestation of Concepts across Time and Space, and co-editor, with Luis Pérez-González and Bolette Blaagaard of the Routledge series Critical Perspectives on Citizen Media.  She is author of In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation (Routledge, 1992; second edition 2011) and Translation and Conflict: A Narrative Account (Routledge, 2006), Editor of Translating Dissent: Voices from and with the Egyptian Revolution (Routledge, 2016), the Routledge Encyclopedia of Translation Studies (1998, 2001; second edition, co-edited with Gabriela Saldanha, 2009); Critical Concepts: Translation Studies (4 volumes, Routledge, 2009); and Critical Readings in Translation Studies (Routledge, 2010). Her articles have appeared in a wide range of international journals, including Social Movement Studies, Critical Studies on Terrorism, The Translator and Target. She is founding Editor of The Translator (St. Jerome Publishing, 1995-2013), former Editorial Director of St. Jerome Publishing (1995-2013), and founding Vice-President of IATIS, the International Association for Translation & Intercultural Studies (2004-2015).

Luis Pérez-González

Luis Perez-Gonzalez

Luis Pérez-González is Professor of Translation Studies and Co-Director of the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester, UK. He is co-investigator on the AHRC-funded project Genealogies of Knowledge: The Evolution and Contestation of Concepts across Time and Space and a research associate of the Manchester-led multi-site research consortium on Cross-language Dynamics: Re-shaping Communities, funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Open World Research Initiative. He is the author of Audiovisual Translation: Theories, Methods and Issues (Routledge, 2014), former Editor of The Interpreter and Translator Trainer (St Jerome Publishing), and a co-editor of Routledge’s Critical Perspectives on Citizen Media series. He is currently editing The Routledge Handbook of Audiovisual Translation (2016), having previously guest-edited special issues of The Journal of Language and Politics 11(2) (Translation and the Genealogy of Conflict, 2012) and The Translator 18(2) (Non-professionals Translating and Interpreting: Participatory and Engaged Perspectives, 2012, with Şebnem Susam-Saraeva). He is serving as Leader of the Translation and Interpreting Studies Pathway in the AHRC’s North West Consortium Doctoral Training Partnership and is a member of the ARTIS (Advancing Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies) Steering Board.

Peter Pormann

Peter PormannAfter studying Classics, French, and Islamic Studies in Paris (Sorbonne), Hamburg, and Tübingen, I took an MA in Islamic Studies at the University of Leiden, and an M.Phil. and D.Phil in Classics at the University of Oxford (Corpus Christi College). As an undergraduate, my prime motivation in choosing Classics was to understand ‘our’ Western culture, for surely its two main roots were Graeco-Roman Antiquity and the Judaeo-Christian tradition. Little did I know that a third ‘root’, Islamic culture, is intrinsically linked to our own tradition, a fact conveniently forgotten by ideologues of different persuasions. My teaching and research therefore tries to rectify this misconception by investigating the many contacts between Muslims, Jews, and Christians writing in Greek, Latin, Hebrew, and Arabic, be it in the tenth or the twentieth century.

Saturnino Luz

Saturnino Luz

Saturnino Luz is a Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Edinburgh, and a co-investigator on the Genealogies of Knowledge project. His reseach interests include machine learning, corpus-based natural language processing, and interfaces for visualisation of textual and temporal information, and applications of these methods in the area of medical informatics. He has published extensively in these areas. Dr. Luz was a principal investigator in the Centre for Next Generation Localisation (CNGL, now ADAPT Centre), and has served in the programme committees of several international conferences and in the editorial board of a number of scientific journals.

Kamran Karimullah

Kamran Karimullah joined the University of Manchester as a lecturer in Islamic philosophy and medicine in 2016. He has published in the fields of Islamic philosophical ethics, philosophy of logic and Islamic medicine. At the moment, he is writing a monograph-length genealogy of Avicenna’s (d. 1037) logical theory of ifs. In it he hopes to show how Avicenna’s pioneering logical doctrines relating to conditional propositions draw on Greek, Arabic and even Syriac debates about and classifications of logical inference. In medical translation studies, he is interested in tracing how pre-modern Arabic medical texts influenced the reception, conceptualisation and translation of European medical texts in early modern medical schools and institutions of learning in the Middle East.

Henry Jones

Henry Jones

Henry Jones is a post-doctoral research associate at the University of Manchester, UK. He holds a BA in French Studies from the University of Sheffield and an MA in Translation Studies from the University of Manchester. Having developed an interest in the roles of translators and translation in the production of knowledge, his recently completed PhD thesis explores the complex multilingual practices involved in the collaborative construction of the user-generated encyclopaedia Wikipedia. He now hopes to make further contributions to this area of investigation through his work on the Genealogies of Knowledge project.

Advisory Board

Guyda Armstrong

Guyda Armstrong

Guyda Armstrong is Senior Lecturer in Italian and Faculty Academic Lead for Digital Humanities at the University of Manchester. Her research is primarily focused on materiality and translation, and she has published extensively on early Italian literature and its translation and transmission across languages, cultures, and media from the medieval period to the present day. Her wider research interests include early modern print cultures, visual design, digital humanities, and gender. She is the author of The English Boccaccio: A History in Books (UTP, 2013, paperback edition 2015), and co-editor of the new Cambridge Companion to Boccaccio (2015). She is currently completing a new edition of the 1620 English translation of Boccaccio’s Decameron for the MHRA, and will shortly begin work as Co-I on the AHRC-funded project Petrarch Commentaries and Exegesis in Renaissance Italy, c. 1350-1650 with colleagues in Warwick and Leeds.

Stuart Jones

Stuart Jones

Stuart Jones is Professor of Intellectual History at the University of Manchester. His research interests focus on the history of political thought and of political concepts in modern Europe, on the history of universities, and on the emergent field of the history of the humanities. He is the author of The French State in Question (1993), Victorian Political Thought (2000), and Intellect and Character in Victorian England: Mark Pattison and the Invention of the Don (2007). He has also translated and edited the political writings of Auguste Comte, and co-edited a volume on pluralism in modern France. He convenes a research network on the history of the humanities, and chairs the University’s Research Group on University History. His main current project is a political and intellectual biography of James Bryce (1838-1922), the jurist, historian, humanitarian campaigner, cabinet minister, and UK ambassador to Washington. Professor Jones serves as Associate Dean for Postgraduate Research in the Faculty of Humanities.

David Langslow

David Langslow

David Langslow is Professor of Classics at the University of Manchester. His interests include Ancient Greek and Latin special and technical languages and language contact in the Greek and Roman worlds down to the early medieval period in the West. His first book, Medical Latin in the Roman Empire, was inspired by the question what are the possible and the preferred means of extending the expressive means of a language so as to refer to and discuss new special and technical things. This led to the particular instance of the extension of the Latin language in the first century AD to accommodate the essentially Greek science of medicine, and to general questions around the translating of science. This led in turn on the one hand to wide ranging work on multilingualism as reflected in corpus languages, and on the other to the very particular undertaking (in progress) of the first critical edition of the Latin version of the medical works of the canonical Greek doctor Alexander of Tralles (5th/6th c. AD).

Maeve Olohan

Maeve Olohan

Maeve Olohan is Senior Lecturer in Translation Studies and Co-Director of the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester. Her recent research has focused both on the translation of science in historical contexts and on the workplace practices of today’s translation professionals. The common thread running through these studies is the conceptualisation of translation as practice and a concomitant interest in the socialities and materialities of translation, explored further in a monograph on practice-theoretical approaches to translation (Routledge, in preparation). She is the author of Scientific and Technical Translation (2016) and Introducing Corpora in Translation Studies (2004) and editor of Intercultural Faultlines: Research Models in Translation Studies (2000). In 2011 she co-edited, with Myriam Salama-Carr, a special issue of The Translator 17(2) on science in translation.  She serves on the AHRC Peer Review College, the Board of the European Masters in Translation and the Steering Board of ARTIS (Advancing Research in Translation and Interpreting Studies).

Mathew Philpotts

Matthew Philpotts

Matthew Philpotts is Professor of German Cultural History and Head of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Liverpool. One of his principal research interests is the active agency of periodical publications, especially literary and intellectual journals, in the construction and circulation of ideas and in processes of cultural change. Having completed a periodisation project on the mid-twentieth-century (The Modern Restoration: Re-Thinking German Literary History, 2004) he co-authored with Stephen Parker the first book-length study of the legendary East German journal Sinn und Form (Anatomy of a Literary Journal, 2009). Working comparatively and adopting a sociological approach to cultural and intellectual history, he has continued to work in recent years to conceptualise the emerging field of periodical studies, editing a special 'Theory' issue of the Victorian Periodical Review (2015). He is a member of the core group of the European Society for Periodical Research (ESPRit) and an editor of the Journal for European Periodical Research (JEPS). He is currently completing a monograph exploring the distinctive role played by editors of intellectual magazines in twentieth-century Europe.

Myriam Salama-carr

Myriam Salama-carr

Myriam Salama-Carr is Honorary Research Fellow at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, SALC. Her research focuses on the history of translation, with particular focus on the translation of science and the transmission of knowledge. She is the author of La Traduction à l’époque abasside (Didier Erudition 1990) and the editor of Translating and Interpreting Conflict (Rodopi 2007) and of a special issue of Social Semiotics on Translation and Conflict (2007). She has co-edited a special issue of Forum (2009) on Ideology and Cross-Cultural Encounters, and of The Translator (2011) on Translating Science. She is investigator in a QNRF-funded project on the construction of an anthology of the Arabic Discourse on Translation (2015-2018) and co-editor of a Handbook on Languages at War (Palgrave series on Languages at War) to be published in 2018. She is the Director of the National Network for Translationand Chair of the Training Committee on IATIS.

Carsten Timmermann

Carsten Timmermann

Carsten Timmermann is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine at the University of Manchester. Originally trained in biochemistry before turning to the history of science, technology and medicine, his current research focuses on issues in the history of modern medicine and medical science. He has published on the history of chronic disease, especially cardiovascular conditions and cancer. His most recent books are A History of Lung Cancer: The Recalcitrant Disease (2013) and (with Elizabeth Toon) Cancer Patients, Cancer Pathways: Historical and Sociological Perspectives (2012). He has also collaborated in a project exploring the use of text mining in the history of medicine. His teaching has covered many aspects in the history of science, technology and medicine and currently includes an introduction to the history of biology, a course on the history of psychiatry, and a survey of the history of medicine. Carsten is Chair of the executive committee of the Society for the Social History of Medicine.

Simone Turchetti

Simone Turchetti

Simone Turchetti is a lecturer at the Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), University of Manchester. In 1997 he graduated at the University of Rome “La Sapienza” and then completed Master (2000) and Ph.D. (2003) at the CHSTM. He then worked at the Universities of Bristol and Leeds before returning to the CHSTM in 2009. There he led a project funded by the European Research Council (TEUS - The Earth Under Surveillance) that was completed in 2014.

Simone’s main interest is in science, technology and international relations (foreign affairs, global governance, and international collaborative scientific endeavours especially in the geosciences). Other relevant interests include: climate change policy and research, nuclear energy, the interplay of scientific research, intelligence and surveillance, scientific migrations, science policy and science studies.

He has published and edited several articles and volumes. The last (ed. with Elena Aronova) focuses on science studies during the Cold War period (Science Studies during the Cold War and Beyond: Paradigms Defected). His forthcoming book is on the history of NATO’s science and environmental programs (The Greening Alliance. Science, The Environment and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, University of Chicago Press, 2018).

Andreja Zevnik

Andreja Zevnik

Andreja Zevnik is a Lecturer in International Politics at the University of Manchester. Her research is inspired by psychoanalysis, continental philosophy and aesthetic politics and mainly focuses on the production of subjectivity in acts of resistance. Her most recent project examines how the experience of anxiety alters forms of political participation, produces different political/resisting subjectivities and moulds new political realities. She is particularly interested in the various struggles associated with the civil rights movement in the US and the BlackLivesMatter campaign. Dr. Zevnik is convener of the Critical Global Politics research cluster and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Narrative Politics. She is author of Lacan, Deleuze and World Politics: Re-thinking the ontology of the political subject (Routledge 2016), and co-editor (with Samo Tomsic) of Jacques Lacan Between Psychoanalysis and Politics (Routledge 2015), (with Bostjan Nedoh) of Lacan and Deleuze: A disjunctive synthesis (Edinburgh University Press 2016), and (with Emmy Eklundh and Emmanuel-Pierre Guittet) of Politics of Anxiety (Rowman & Littlefield 2016).

Postgraduate Research

Jan Buts

Jan Buts

Jan Buts is a Ph.D. student with a background in English and Dutch linguistics and literature. His current project, Prefiguring the Body Politic: Continental Philosophy and Online Alternative Media, focuses on the political significance of structural features of language. The project employs the Genealogies of Knowledge Modern and Internet subcorpora to trace the recent trajectory of three concepts – community, democracy, and politics. These concepts’ linguistic positioning is studied especially in translations from late twentieth century French philosophy and in a selection of online publications on activism. By thus charting how the idea of the body politic is conceptualised in these texts, the research project  attempts to reassess the relation between discourse and direct action.